Journal articles on dating violence


Healthy relationship behaviors can have a positive effect on a teenager's emotional development, while unhealthy, abusive or violent relationships can cause both short- and long-term negative effects on the individual's development into adulthood.

Teen dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, or emotional violence within a dating relationship.

The same year, assault by sharp object resulted in roughly 114,000 deaths, with a remaining 110,000 deaths from personal violence being attributed to other causes. There is a strong relationship between levels of violence and modifiable factors such as concentrated poverty, income and gender inequality, the harmful use of alcohol, and the absence of safe, stable, and nurturing relationships between children and parents.

Strategies addressing the underlying causes of violence can be effective in preventing violence.

Corlin, past president of the American Medical Association said: "The United States leads the world—in the rate at which its children die from firearms." He concluded: "Gun violence is a threat to the public health of our country." Furthermore, violence often has lifelong consequences for physical and mental health and social functioning and can slow economic and social development.

In 2013, assault by firearm was the leading cause of death due to interpersonal violence, with 180,000 such deaths estimated to have occurred.

CDC is committed to stopping violence before it begins.

In the process of socializing during adolescence, early teens usually remain in same-sex groups with very little social contact with the opposite sex, while mid-adolescents tend to hang out together in a loose confederation of boys and girls.

Many more survive violence and suffer physical, mental, and or emotional health problems throughout the rest of their lives.

This study is part of a special series of articles on teen dating violence guest edited by Lohman for the April issue of the .

It is one of the first studies to examine patterns of violence over three decades to see how children exposed to psychological violence and family stress were affected in relationships later in life.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

This initial categorization differentiates between violence a person inflicts upon himself or herself, violence inflicted by another individual or by a small group of individuals, and violence inflicted by larger groups such as states, organized political groups, militia groups and terrorist organizations.

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