Mandating the human papillomavirus

Worldwide, about 500,000 cervical cancers annually and about 100,000 cancers at other sites, including vulva and vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx, are attributable to genital tract HPV [1].

HPV 6 and HPV 11 account for over 90 percent of genital warts, which are very common, with millions of cases annually worldwide, and for nearly 100 percent of a rare disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis of juvenile or adult onset. Cervarix, from Glaxo Smith Kline, is a bivalent vaccine designed to prevent infections with the oncogenic HPV types 16 and 18 [3].

We asked experts to weigh in on the question: "Should the HPV vaccine be mandatory for girls ages 11 to 12 in the United States? " Here are their responses: Arthur Caplan, bioethicist at the University of Pennsylvania: "Yes.

The data show that the vaccine is safe and effective. And mandates still permit people to opt out if they don't want their child vaccinated, as we have for all other 'mandates' — a fact somehow lost in the ignorant comments from GOP candidates about HPV vaccines [last night]." Dr.

HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that, if it doesn’t go away on its own, can lead to cancer.

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According to CDC data, less than half of girls and even fewer boys had completed the three dose series of shots in 2013.

The recognition that invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the end result of some genital tract human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the development of prophylactic vaccines to prevent these infections are major recent achievements of public health medicine.

The quadrivalent Gardasil HPV vaccine from Merck & Co., Inc., was licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June 2006 and was subsequently recommended by the Advisory Council on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for vaccination of adolescent girls and young women.

When it comes to state-mandated vaccines, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make that horse (or in this case, Americans) take the vaccine.

At least that’s the case with Gardasil, a vaccine that protects against nine strains of human papillomavirus, or HPV.

But nine years after it was originally approved, very few states have laws requiring kids to have the HPV vaccine to attend school, according to a new JAMA study. have broad exemptions, so if a parent does not want to vaccinate their child against HPV, they can still send them to school.

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